About Us

In Christian love to serve and seek justice in the community.

Anglican Care began as the Social Service Council of the Diocese of Christchurch, enacted in 1952. The Act brought together a number of older organisations in the Diocese which pursued charitable purposes, including such bodies as St Anne's Guild Society and the Anglican Society of the Friends of the Aged. The objects of the Council are to "organise, promote, perform, evaluate and monitor all forms of Christian social service undertaken by the Agency within the Diocese." The Council currently accomplishes these objects through several divisions, including the City Mission, the Anglican Living Aged Care, and Anglican Care South Canterbury. The Bishop of Christchurch serves as the Warden for the Council, and the Trust Board includes members elected by Synod and by the members of the Council at general meetings. Trust Board members are required to be members of the Anglican Church.

The Rev'd John Shoaf was elected Chair of the Anglican Care South Canterbury Divisional Committee at the Annual General Meeting in July 2015. John had served on the Divisional Committee for about one year prior to being elected Chair. John is currently the Vicar of St Mary's Anglican Church in Timaru.

Oceans Grief & Loss

In 2006 the OCEANS programme was developed in South Canterbury to meet the needs of New Zealand culture and is underpinned by the model of grief known as The Continuing Bonds Model of Grief.

In 2012 Matt Cameron was appointed to coordinate OCEANS and with his background in education, counselling and his Christian faith he has brought the manual together in its current form. A benefit of having our own programme is the way it can be customised at our will and we are constantly looking for ways to modify and improve it.

In 2017, responding to the needs of the community, Matt developed an adult version of Oceans that is similar to the children’s version but also goes deeper to help adults process their grief in a peer environment. Both programmes are raved about by individuals and agencies who have witnessed the positive influence of the programme.

Social Justice Advocacy

Ruth Swale began her role as social justice advocate in 2014 by completing a piece of research into significant social justice issues in South Canterbury.

So far she has developed several new ventures, with teams of volunteers to help keep everything running.

Marchwiel Parish/Oceanview Heights School Partnership
Fundraising for the school’s reading recovery programme, building relationships with the children and their whanau to encourage more family participation in the school

The Advocacy Group
Offering 1-to-1 support for appointments which people find too stressful to handle on their own, and empowering them through small-group workshops to advocate for themselves

Tenancy Link
To encourage self-resolution as the first option when issues arise between tenants and landlords, and to advocate for improved standards for rental housing.